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Infographic: How to register for the ACT and access your score reports (including previous ACT scores)

If you want to take the ACT® test during the 7-8 December test dates or beyond, the first step you will take is to register for the test. You can use MyACT.org to register for the test, find a test center, select a test session (Friday or Saturday in the morning or the afternoon, depending on availability), request accommodations, and request additional score reports. Once you have taken the test, you can also use MyACT.org to access your test scores. However, if you are interested in the results of ACT tests you took prior to September 2018, when the computer-based ACT test was first offered, you will need to use a different route to access your scores. You can find a link to those score reports by searching your email. We have created an infographic to help you register and access your s...

UPDATED: How do I find my ACT test center?

Are you registered for the ACT test but unsure of how to find your test center? No problem! There are two ways to find your test center’s address. Option 1: Sign in to your ACT account. Go to myact.org and sign in. If you have registered for a non-US ACT test but have not yet taken it, you will see your test center address on your dashboard (click here to see screenshot).   Option 2: Check your email.  The confirmation email you received will have the test center address (click here to see screenshot).   If you need more information before test day, contact ACT Customer Care at act-reg@act.org.

What students are saying about ACT computer-based testing

Students around the world participated in the first computer-based ACT® test in September. ACT has received plenty of feedback, and fortunately, students found a lot to like about the new format. Here are some student reactions, as taken from a recent ACT survey: Getting scores quicker! Saves time not having to bubble answer sheets Easier to type essays than to handwrite Liked the answer eliminator tool Liked having my own on-screen timer Liked that the passage and items were all on the same screen for the reading test—no flipping back and forth Liked the highlighting in the English and reading passages that pointed students to the relevant section of text to answer the question Liked the ability to flag items and return to them Students also want to see improvements in the process. Some s...

What to bring (and not bring) to the test center

You can feel calm and prepared for the ACT® test by knowing what you can and cannot bring into your ACT test center! Remember these tips: You MUST bring: Acceptable photo identification (find out more) You CAN bring: A traditional watch (no smart watches and no alarms set) An ACT-approved calculator (Is my calculator approved?) NOTE: Test centers are NOT administering admission tickets at this time. You CANNOT bring: Electronic devices (other than an approved calculator) Textbooks, dictionaries, scratch paper, notes, or other aids (whiteboards will be provided) Highlight pens, colored pens or pencils, or correction fluid/tape Reading material Tobacco or e-cigarettes Food or beverages Prohibited devices To find your test center location, log on to myact.org and navigate to your registration...

Simple steps to register for the ACT test

When you are ready to take the ACT test, the first step is registering for your chosen test date. To complete the registration process, you will need: About 30 minutes A credit card, voucher, or fee waiver A functional email address A list of grades and courses you have taken To get started, you will need to create a MyACT account. The video below will take you through the process of setting up a MyACT account. Once your MyACT account is created, it’s time to register for the test! The video below gives you step-by-step instructions on how to register. NOTE: If you have taken the ACT before September 2018 and want to retake the test, you cannot use your old ACT account to retake the test (you can use it to access your scores from tests taken before September 2018, however). Be sure to crea...

ACT Test Accommodations: What Remains and What’s Changing

Some educators, parents, and students have shared concerns about how the switch to computer-based ACT® testing (CBT) at non-US test centers will affect students who request test accommodations. Here are some things to keep in mind. What’s remaining the same ACT will continue to provide accommodations for students who qualify. Students will continue to work with school officials to request accommodations from ACT. Students will still take the ACT at test centers unless requested accommodations require Special Testing at their home school. Paper testing is still available for students who require accommodations not available on the computer-based test. What’s changing Students who qualify for extended testing time now can receive that accommodation on each section of the test—a 50% time exte...

New Tables Compare ACT to SAT Scores

ACT and the College Board have released new concordance tables that allow users to compare scores from the new SAT test (redesigned in 2016) and the ACT test. The 2018 ACT/SAT concordance tables, derived from a joint comprehensive research study conducted by the two organizations over the past nine months, are based on scores of nearly 600,000 graduating seniors in the class of 2017 who took both tests. ACT and the College Board, with engagement from the NCAA technical committee, periodically produce concordance tables to assist in comparing scores of students who may complete different tests. The ACT and the SAT measure similar but not identical content and skills, and they employ different score scales. The ACT Composite score is based on a scale of 1 to 36, while the SAT Total score ran...

What Is NOT Changing About the ACT® Test

Moving the ACT university admissions test to computer format means more testing opportunities and much faster ACT scores (delivered in days instead of weeks), giving you more time to plan your path to university. But keep this in mind: there is also a lot that’s NOT changing on the ACT test. This is good news for all students, but especially students who have already either taken the ACT test and wish to take it again, or those who have begun preparation. In short, the only big thing that’s changing is the delivery of the test. That’s it—instead of filling in ovals on paper score sheets using a No. 2 pencil, you will take the ACT test on a computer. So, if you have been preparing to take the test for a long time only to hear about changes coming, you can breathe easy. Your preparation is g...

Myths and Facts about ACT® Computer-Based Testing

Starting this September, non-US students taking the ACT university admissions test will do so using computer-based testing (CBT), which offers many benefits for students taking the test. Big changes like this sometimes lead to rumors and misinformation about what you can expect from the test. It’s important to know the difference between myths and facts. Some are listed below (and click here to find even more).   MYTH: CBT is a completely different testing experience. FACT: While computer-based ACT testing is a new format, the content of the test itself WILL NOT CHANGE. It’s simply a new, more efficient way to take the test. Examinees will still take the test in a proctored test environment. The good news is they’ll receive scores much faster and have more opportunities to test...

What’s So Great About Computer-Based Testing?

You might have heard about big changes coming to the ACT® university admissions test. Starting in September, all non-US students will take the test in computer-based testing (CBT) format. ACT made this change with students like you in mind. Benefits to computer-based testing include: Faster scoring. With the paper-based ACT test, you’d have to wait four to six weeks to get your scores back. With computer-based testing, you’ll get ACT scores back in two or three business days. Why that’s great: You can plan your future faster! Whether it’s determining if your scores are high enough to get into the university you want to attend, or you want to make plans to study hard and raise your scores, you can get started much earlier. More opportunities to test. Computer-based testing allows ACT to adm...

Taking the ACT From A Student’s Personal Perspective

Our student guest writer details her personal experience taking the ACT and provides her own tips and tricks for what to expect on test day. So much of our education is built on expectations. Our own expectations, our teachers’ expectations, the expectations of our parents, and even our friends. We strive to meet expectations of things like getting on the soccer team, getting good grades, being a good friend. All of the expectations can make adding another expectation, doing well on a test, feel overwhelming. I’m here to share a bit of my personal experience of taking the ACT: what you can expect, what to do, and what it’s like after it’s all done! It’s really not as bad as you might think!!! I am currently a junior in high school, and I have taken the ACT three times –– ...

Colleges and Universities in the US welcome international applicants…

…However, the process of applying can take significant time and effort, sometimes up to two years. Prepare: First, prepare! Prepare, prepare, prepare! Of course, starting with the Pre-ACT is a great way to practice for the ACT and gives you an idea of where you should start. Search Universities: To make the most of your effort, start your search considering the type of university you want to attend. Are you most comfortable in a large setting, interacting with lots of different classmates? Do you want to experience life in a city, where you take a bus across campus, or do you prefer a walking campus? Do you want to know everyone, or is anonymity okay? Are you comfortable attending a ‘commuter’ institution, where many students leave on weekends, or do you aspire to be a part of a thri...